Eye on Iodine

09 Jan 2012

Posted by karen
karen's picture

Have you ever been told you're high maintenance? Nutritionally, we all are - to sustain and maintain health, our body's daily requirements cuts a lengthy list - water, carboyhdrates, proteins, fats, vitamins, minerals. But unlike the image of "more is better", only small amounts of some things are needed: more accurately, sometimes just a trace.

The mineral, iodine, is one such example. My alert to its significance came after reading a friend's blog with her iodine story, and more recently, a chat with my niece about her  markedly reduced pain from (benign) breast cysts - since using iodine supplementation. 

Check out the FAQs.
 

What does iodine do?

-- helps metabolize excess fat
-- necessary for physical and mental development (why it's so important for women of childbearing age and children)
-- produces thyroid hormones that regulate the body's metabolic energy

What's the scoop on how much, too much?

-- no significant danger of iodine toxicity from a natural diet
-- small risk of chronic iodine excess, but care should be taken with supplements - excessive amounts can reduce thyroid function, possible effects are a metallic taste or sores in the mouth, diarrhea, vomiting 
-- worst case deficiency - goiter disease: the thyroid gland doesn't have enough iodine to manufacture hormones and as the cells are trying to trap more iodine they swell, eventually causing the whole gland to enlarge
 

What contributes to iodine deficiency?

-- increased exposure to toxic substances that displace iodine, e.g. radiation, fluoride
-- iodine-deficicent soil
-- replacing iodized sea salt with white sea salt -a product processed to make it 'free flowing' and is not abundant in minerals
--inadequate dietary intake
-- thyroid function may slow down with aging
 

Possible symptoms of iodine deficiency.

-- fatigue
-- brain fog
-- extra weight that just won't "get lost"
-- hair loss
 

Natural food sources for iodine.

-- seafood (carefully check your sources for possible mercury toxicity)
-- sea vegetables - seaweed like nori, wakame, dulce. Kelp is the most common for high iodine and is also rich in other minerals and low in sodium. 
-- vegetables grown in iodine-rich soil (higher probability in areas closer to the sea as compared to inland) - garlic, onions, mushrooms, spinach, lettuce
-- iodized salt or unprocessed sea salt - be aware not to overdo these, although sea salt does have less of an effect on blood pressure than processed table salt
 
 
 
Kelp as a supplement.
-- is most often sold as a powder or in a liquid form to add to drinking water
-- it is rich in iodine, the B vitamins and also a source of other minerals and trace elements
-- reported to be beneficial to brain tissue, sensory nerves, blood vessels
-- used in treatment of thyroid problems and may protect against the effects of radiation
 
 
Seafood and sea vegetables are staples in Japanese cooking - a good way to eat healthy, usually lighter meals, and a food source for iodine. My daughter and her family, who got us hooked on sushi (which is easier to order in a restaurant than to make at home), came up with the simplified version below.
 

Roll-Your-Own (Maki) Sushi

Sushi works best with white rice. Not a food I normally recommend but for this recipe I'm compromising for the upside of getting more sea vegetables in your family's diet. You can make a pot of rice as you normally would, or if you want to - and have time for - making "proper" sushi rice, you can use the following method. To be honest, I've only gone as far as mixing in the vinegar mixture - hats off to you if you get to the cooling part!
 
2 cups sushi or short grain rice
2 cups water, plus extra for rinsing rice
2 Tbsp rice vinegar
2 Tbsp agave syrup
1 Tbsp sea salt
 
Place rice into a bowl and cover with water. Rinse at least 3 times or until the water is clear. Put the rice and 2 cups water into a pan and place over high heat. Bring to a boil, uncovered. Once it begins to bowl, reduce heat to low and cover. Cook for 15 mins, remove from heat and let stand, covered, for 10 minutes.
 
Combine the rice vinegar, agave and salt in small bowl and mix until dissolved. Transfer the rice to large bowl and add the vinegar mixture. Fold gently but thoroughly to combine and coat each grain of rice with the mixture. Transfer to a large flat baking pan. Fan the rice with a piece of cardboard while turning gently with a fork until it has all cooled. It's easier with 2 people! This will make it shiny and slightly sticky - which is the trick you're trying to achieve.
 
So that's it for the rice.
 
The other ingredients:
nori sheets
tamari sauce and wasabi for dipping
 
And your choice of the following:
finely julienned slices of carrots and cucumber
sliced fresh mushrooms and/or your choice of rehydrated "wild" mushrooms
chopped green onions
avocado slices
small slices of tofu
finely sliced pepper
pickled ginger
black sesame seeds
smoked salmon or canned tuna (non-vegetarian option)
 
Now for the eating...
 
Cut the nori sheets along the perforated markings, than again in half, so you have pieces about 1 1/4" x 3 1/2". These pieces will be your individual sushi rolls. Fill your plate with a spoonful of rice and whatever other fillings you want. Use the nori pieces either as a scoop or base for the rice, then put your other selected fillings on top and roll as much as you're able - dip in a bit of tamari sauce and wasabi and enjoy! With everyone building and rolling, dipping and eating, it's not a tidy affair - but delicious. Take your time - share an eating experience and good conversation around your table.
 
If you're not quite ready to go with the sushi, start your Japanese cooking with this simple condiment. Gomasio fills your kitchen with a wonderful nutty, toasty aroma when you make it. I dare you to try resisting eating it directly out of the spice jar! Thanks to Kira from Food Works Nutrition for this recipe, and one for sushi rice.

Gomasio

1/4 cup raw sesame seeds
1 tsp. Celtic Sea Salt (or other unprocessed sea salt)
1 Tbsp. dulse flakes (readily available where I live on the Atlantic coast - yeah!) 
 
Roast the sesame seeds in a pan at a low heat until they are just starting to pop. Take them off and let cool for 5 minutes. Add the salt and grind in a clean coffee or spice grinder. Don't grind them so much that it turns into flour - which I found out happens very quickly, mine almost got to that point. You want it to have texture. Add the dulse flakes, put in a glass jar with a lid and refrigerate. (My husband took a deep whiff of this - he loved the smell and the answer to his question what we'd sprinkle it on? "Anything and everything.") 
 
(Note: the material on Real Food Matters is not meant for medical diagnosis or treatment. For health concerns, I recommend you see your physician or health practitioner.)

 

Comments

Sarah's picture

I found your blog recently, from a reference on your daughter's blog.  I just wanted to say "thank you" for all the good information and recipes you provide here.  I check in daily in hopes that you have posted and I enjoy your blog very much.  Thank you!


karen's picture

I appreciate hearing from you and finding out you're receiving something valuable to add to your nutrition 'education'. Perhaps some time in the future I'll be able to up my ante from one post/week!


kitchen's picture

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my trouble. You're wonderful! Thank you!


Kika@embracingimperfection's picture

Interesting and informative post. I have a good friend who is Korean and over Christmas holidays we discussed getting together to make sushi (futomaki for me) - she will teach me how. Looks fun. I crave green things and when I get into the city enjoy getting a little Futomaki just for the seaweed. My family, on the other hand, has zero interest in eating it.


karen's picture

How fortunate to have a friend who will "eat green" with you - perhaps it's an acquired taste. Your story takes me back many years - to when a Japanese gentleman who stayed at our B&B (another life/story) encouraged us to invite friends over for a night of "building" and eating sushi, with his expert help. You're going to have fun! 


Nathan Woodbury's picture

Great. This really make sense and you really did a good job to this one. Because every reader able to understand your concept and able to know the benefits of the products. Continue to invite readers on how to be resourceful and do some experimentations.


karen's picture

It's my goal to write with clarity - thanks so much for your comment to hear when it happens! We all really do have to live-walk our own nutrition path - which isn't always easy to figure out.  But approached with curiosity, intention - and adventure - I think it's a very interesting and exciting journey.


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